Nusa Lembongan: Small Island, Big Allure

Each and Every Destination As Incredible as the Last…Thank You

What an Amazing World!

Massive waves break onto a narrow niche on a limestone cliff, producing a dramatic swash with a merciless, thundering sound. A thin wisp of ocean spray dampens everything on the shore. Devil’s tears, aptly named for its daunting showcase of Mother Nature’s raw power on the eastern shore of Nusa Lembongan, is violently beautiful.

Not far from it, Dream Beach is a place to unwind while witnessing the relentless force of the Indian Ocean. I soak my body in a swimming pool overlooking the beach, a picturesque narrow strip of white sand with big tides. A man in his 20s wearing flashy red swimming trunks jumps excitedly onto the coming waves, acting as though he’s a superhero. A big grin is splashed across his face, spreading also on mine.

Nusa Lembongan is a completely different world from her bigger sister, Bali. Separated by a narrow strait less than 10 km…

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Taman Sari: Life in the Sultan’s Own Backyard

This Is Just INCREDIBLE…MAGICAL!

What an Amazing World!

“Transport Mister? Water Castle?” all rickshaw drivers kept asking me the same questions during my visit to Yogyakarta (Jogja) in January 2011. It was not my first trip to the city, however I always missed Taman Sari – or better known as the Water Castle to foreigners – on my previous visits for so many reasons, until this July.

On a sunny Tuesday morning, Alexander, Detta and I were joined by a group of local university students before the ornate gate of Taman Sari complex. Painted in an ivory color, the floral-patterned gate led to a small courtyard with a manicured garden which brought us to the royal bathing complex, a walled compound of three bathing pools and a watch tower.

During its heyday the tower was used by past Sultans to watch their concubines bathing in the pools and later choose his favored one to enjoy the privilege of…

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Death of Babar’s Mother — Jean de Brunhoff

I grew up With BABAR on TV…And I Still Enjoy Watching on Saturday Mornings…

Biblioklept

In early drafts for the first Babar book, Jean de Brunhoff opened the story with this episode showing the death of Babar’s mother. In the published book, he began instead with the reassuring image of Babar’s mother rocking him to sleep in a hammock. At this stage in his composition process, Jean had not yet given his protagonist the name “Babar” — he was called simply “Baby Elephant.”

–Via/about/more.

 

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Google Doodle Honors Physicist Léon Foucault, Shows How the Earth Spins

NewsFeed

Today’s Google Doodle celebrates the life of the nineteenth-century, French physicist Léon Foucault, and features one of his most impressive inventions: the Foucault pendulum.

Back in the 19th century, it was well known that the earth rotated on its axis, but scientists had struggled to find a simple way of demonstrating this concept. Some particularly ambitious researchers tried dropping weights from high altitudes, or even launching a cannon balls vertically upwards and hoping the earth rotated sufficiently while the projectile was airborne that the ball’s launch point and landing point would deviate in a measurable fashion.

(PHOTOS:History of Google Doodles)

Luckily, before anyone could get seriously injured by these types of experiments, Foucault came to the rescue. He devised a stunningly-elegant test using a multi-directional pendulum. The pendulum would be released over a thin layer of sand, at such a height that the pendulum’s bob would barely graze…

View original post 264 more words

Google Doodle Honors Physicist Léon Foucault, Shows How the Earth Spins

NewsFeed

Today’s Google Doodle celebrates the life of the nineteenth-century, French physicist Léon Foucault, and features one of his most impressive inventions: the Foucault pendulum.

Back in the 19th century, it was well known that the earth rotated on its axis, but scientists had struggled to find a simple way of demonstrating this concept. Some particularly ambitious researchers tried dropping weights from high altitudes, or even launching a cannon balls vertically upwards and hoping the earth rotated sufficiently while the projectile was airborne that the ball’s launch point and landing point would deviate in a measurable fashion.

(PHOTOS:History of Google Doodles)

Luckily, before anyone could get seriously injured by these types of experiments, Foucault came to the rescue. He devised a stunningly-elegant test using a multi-directional pendulum. The pendulum would be released over a thin layer of sand, at such a height that the pendulum’s bob would barely graze…

View original post 264 more words

Google Doodle Honors Physicist Léon Foucault, Shows How the Earth Spins

NewsFeed

Today’s Google Doodle celebrates the life of the nineteenth-century, French physicist Léon Foucault, and features one of his most impressive inventions: the Foucault pendulum.

Back in the 19th century, it was well known that the earth rotated on its axis, but scientists had struggled to find a simple way of demonstrating this concept. Some particularly ambitious researchers tried dropping weights from high altitudes, or even launching a cannon balls vertically upwards and hoping the earth rotated sufficiently while the projectile was airborne that the ball’s launch point and landing point would deviate in a measurable fashion.

(PHOTOS:History of Google Doodles)

Luckily, before anyone could get seriously injured by these types of experiments, Foucault came to the rescue. He devised a stunningly-elegant test using a multi-directional pendulum. The pendulum would be released over a thin layer of sand, at such a height that the pendulum’s bob would barely graze…

View original post 264 more words

Diana Nyad responds to questions over swim

This Just In

After dodging sharks and jellyfish during her swim from Cuba to Florida, Diana Nyad is now dealing with a different challenge: tough questions from her fellow marathon swimmers about the legitimacy of her achievement.

In the days since Nyad walked out of the water last week at Key West after swimming 110 miles, a stream of questions has come at her.

Could her speed have nearly doubled at one point? Did any of her team members touch her or support her? How could she have gone for hours without food or water?

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